Reebok Astroride A4.0 Exercise Bike Review

The Astroride A.40 from Reebok is another addition to an ever-expanding range of fitness machines that we’re seeing from this venerable global manufacturer. With a particular flair for entry-level exercise bikes, Reebok has had its share of market hits over the years. To see if their Astroride A.40 model has the potential to hit those dizzy heights we got one in for testing.

A quick word on assembly. It’s simple enough. The manual is clear and easy to follow and there’s nothing in the least bit complex to do.

Once built the Astroride A.40 is a decent looking bike. It’s got a nice white and grey colour scheme and smooth contours and lines that make it look modern and, it has to be said, stylish.

With a footprint of 100cm x 52cm (39.4″ x 20.5″) this is an average-sized model which will be at home in most rooms, even if space is fairly tight. There are plenty of adjustments to get things set up as you like so it’s a simple thing to get comfortable. The saddle is gel-padded and while not the worlds most luxurious pad to sit on, it does do a good job of providing cushioning where it’s needed the most. The saddle also adjusts vertically to a maximum of 95cm giving plenty of scope for taller users to get comfy and horizontally so shorter users can get closer to the handlebars. The handlebars themselves are adjustable too, with the ability to tilt towards or away from the rider. The riding position is technically sound and the bike overall feels well built and sturdy.

There’s a 6kg flywheel in use here and it does a reasonably good job of keeping things ticking over nicely. The ride is smooth, consistent and all but totally silent with only the gentlest of internal sounds making it to one’s ears.

Being a manual resistance bike there are only 8 levels of resistance. On an electronic bike, you’d typically expect 24 or 32 levels so 8 does seem a little crude. The difference between each level is very noticeable and the top end of the resistance isn’t all that high but will be OK for the typical home user who wants to get their heart rate up a bit a couple of times a week and stay flexible.

The console on the Astroride A4.0 is a basic affair. It’s battery-powered and as the computer has no control over the resistance it can only deliver information so very few functions are available compared with almost any electronically controlled model you’d care to think of. This is something of a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it’s very, very simple to use. On the other, it doesn’t do much in the way of keeping things interesting or helping to motivate you to push yourself. The display shows your time, speed, distance, calories and RPM and there’s also a fitness recovery test which gives you a fitness ranking that ranges from below average to excellent. There are target workouts to choose from that are based on time, calories and distance and these simply count down from your target until you reach zero. It’s as simple as it gets in terms of ease of use, but it is limited in scope.

There’s a pair of handgrip pulse sensors which give you a rough idea of your heart rate without being particularly accurate, a water bottle holder which is nice to see and a set of transport wheels making it easy to move around if you need to. The Astroride A4.0 also comes with Reebok’s 2-year on-site parts and labour warranty.

Best Price

Currently available for £179.99 from SportsDirect.com

Review Summary - In Brief

The Reebok Astroride A.40 is well built and it looks really good. It's also suitable for a wide range of users of various shapes and sizes and is easy to use. If you're looking for a very (very, very) simple bike that you'll use to build up a sweat a couple of times a week this could make a good choice, but it really is very limited and for this sort of money you can get so much more. For just a very small amount extra it's possible to jump up several notches with models from other manufacturers. The DKN AM-E has a heavier flywheel, fully electronically controlled resistance, offers heart rate controlled workouts and has a wireless heart rate receiver but costs around the same. The Viavito Satori too is also significant step up. With a 9kg flywheel, 20 onboard workouts, 32 levels of resistance, a wireless receiver, heart rate control, and 4 user profiles it's a world away from the Astroride A.40, yet only costs a little bit more making it much better value.

Reebok Astroride A4.0 Specifications

    • 6 kg (13.2 lbs) flywheel
    • 8 levels of manual resistance
    • 5.75″ LCD display
    • 4 Programs include: 3 target workouts, recovery
    • Feedback: speed, time, distance, calories burnt, pulse
    • Heart rate measurement via hand pulse sensors
    • Adjustable foot straps
    • Adjustable vertically and horizontally comfortable seat with regulated high
    • Adjustable handlebar
    • Floor level adjustment
    • Additional features: transport wheels, water bottle holder
    • Max. user weight: 120kg (264.6 lbs)
    • Product weight: 30kg (66.1 lbs)
    • Dimensions (L x W x H): 100cm (39.4″) x 52cm (20.5″) x 130cm (51.2″)
    • Batteries included

Reebok Astroride A4.0 - Console / Display Unit

Reebok Astroride A4.0 - User Reviews

The Pros

  • Easy to assemble
  • Comfortable riding position
  • Good looks
  • Built well

The Cons

  • Limited in scope and function
  • You're not getting a whole lot for your money
Reebok Astroride A4.0 Reviewer Ratings

 

Appearance - 8
Smoothness - 7
Comfort - 8
Programmes - 3
Ease Of Use - 10
Warranty - 8.5
Value for Money - 5
Best Price

Currently available for £179.99 from SportsDirect.com

Also see our Exercise Bike Comparison Table

Whilst every effort is made to give you accurate information we cannot guarantee the technical specification. Models change on a regular basis and may differ slightly from the above review. We recommend you contact the retailer if you have a question regarding technical data. Please read our Legal Disclaimer

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